Why is TikTok the new craze?

by Karina Aguilar / Staff Reporter

TikTok logo. Photo courtesy of unsplash.com.

Tiktok has become very popular since August 2018, when ByteDance bought Musical.ly and merged all of their accounts onto TikTok. In the United States alone, the number of adult TikTok users increased by 5.5 times over the past 18 months. Currently, there are at least 26.5 million active users each month in the United States, according to omnicoreagency.com.

TikTok is especially popular among high school or college-aged individuals. At least 41 percent of users are between 16 and 24 years old. 

Whether students are signing up for some lighthearted entertainment, using the app as a means of communicating with friends, or downloading it out of pure irony, TikTok is gaining popularity among young adults worldwide.

“I originally got the app as a joke, but I’d say my favorite part of TikTok is sending videos back and forth with my friends,” said Allison Ford, a junior early childhood education major. “It keeps us in contact even if we’re not actually having a conversation on the phone.”

Aside from keeping students in communication with friends, many say the app serves as a tool for forming new connections.

“I make TikToks maybe two or three times a week. I like making them because of the dancing, and it makes me feel like a part of a community,” said Mihika Milind KulkarniI, a graduate student studying clinical psychology. “I feel connected to people just by doing the same steps as they’re doing from across the globe.”

Some students prefer TikTok over other social media platforms because of its familiarity to the now-deleted app Vine. With its short videos and a seemingly endless stream of content, students say TikTok helps them wind down after a long day of school, or distract them from the harsh realities of day-to-day life.

“I like TikTok because the content really reminds me of Vine. It’s super addicting and entertaining, just like Vine was when it was around,” said senior criminal justice major Bryan Meyer. “I watch TikToks to take breaks from homework and before going to bed to relax a bit.” 

Not only can TikTok be a good tool to destress from a long day, but it can also get users’ bodies moving. For many, learning TikTok “dances” seems to be a fun way for some students to get their blood pumping and blow off some steam, while also doing what they love. An example of a very popular dance is “Savage” by Megan Thee Stallion.

“I honestly like to think that TikTok is a good distraction when I’m going through a lot of stress. The songs are catchy, and my brain focuses only on learning the dances. I’ve danced for 20 years and recently, with grad school, have not been able to dance as much as I used to,” said KulkarniI. “TikTok motivates me to go on and practice, in which case I just forget about everything like my assignments. It’s like rekindling a fire and being physically healthy.”

Although some students seem to only have good things to say about TikTok, some admitted that the app’s constant stream of content can feel repetitive.

“My least favorite part about TikTok is that I feel like everyone uses the same voice overs and music,” said Alexa Jones, a junior criminal justice major. “You could be scrolling through the ‘for you’ page and three videos in a row would all have the same music.”

Regardless of how repetitive TikTok may be, it doesn’t seem to stop students from scrolling through their “for you” page throughout their day, a page that is based off of algorithms to show users genres that they would most likely enjoy.  Users spend an average of 52 minutes per day on TikTok.

Some students claim that they have started to use TikTok more during the COVID-19 quarantine, as they have found themselves with an unusual amount of free time. 

“I think TikTok is more popular now due to the quarantine,” said junior psychology major, Dayana Escudero-Ambriz. “People have nothing to do, so they watch TikTok videos and also participate in making them.”

Students may also be spending more time on TikTok because of the amount of spare time they might have available, but it also seems to be helping them cope with the stresses of the nationwide quarantine.

“It definitely keeps me connected with the world, because there are all kinds of people around the world making TikToks. Especially now with the pandemic going on, there are a lot of videos about that,” said Jones. “It provides an escape from stress because there are some videos that are just so funny it definitely takes my mind off of what’s going on in the world right now.”

Jones said before the quarantine, she would typically spend an hour or so on TikTok, but now she spends up to three hours on the app because “there’s not much else to do.”

On the other hand, some students are spending less time on TikTok than they normally would because of the amount of stuff they have to do.

“I probably spend about two hours a day on TikTok, but I think since the quarantine I’ve spent less time on it because my professors are actually giving me more work to do,” said Ford.

Regardless of why students enjoy TikTok, it seems like the app is a medium where students can go to in order to connect with others, take their minds off of an inarguably chaotic world, and have a good laugh.

Tiktok has become very popular since August 2018, when ByteDance bought Musical.lyI and merged all of their accounts onto TikTok. In the United States alone, the number of adult TikTok users increased by 5.5 times over the past 18 months. Currently, there are at least 26.5 million active users each month in the United States, according to omnicoreagency.com.

TikTok is especially popular among high school or college-aged individuals. At least 41 percent of users are between 16 and 24 years old. 

Whether students are signing up for some lighthearted entertainment, using the app as a means of communicating with friends, or downloading it out of pure irony, TikTok is gaining popularity among young adults worldwide.

“I originally got the app as a joke, but I’d say my favorite part of TikTok is sending videos back and forth with my friends,” said Allison Ford, a junior early childhood education major. “It keeps us in contact even if we’re not actually having a conversation on the phone.”

Aside from keeping students in communication with friends, many say the app serves as a tool for forming new connections.

“I make TikToks maybe two or three times a week. I like making them because of the dancing, and it makes me feel like a part of a community,” said Mihika Milind KulkarniI, a graduate student studying clinical psychology. “I feel connected to people just by doing the same steps as they’re doing from across the globe.”

Some students prefer TikTok over other social media platforms because of its familiarity to the now-deleted app Vine. With its short videos and a seemingly endless stream of content, students say TikTok helps them wind down after a long day of school, or distract them from the harsh realities of day-to-day life.

“I like TikTok because the content really reminds me of Vine. It’s super addicting and entertaining, just like Vine was when it was around,” said senior criminal justice major Bryan Meyer. “I watch TikToks to take breaks from homework and before going to bed to relax a bit.” 

Not only can TikTok be a good tool to destress from a long day, but it can also get users’ bodies moving. For many, learning TikTok “dances” seems to be a fun way for some students to get their blood pumping and blow off some steam, while also doing what they love. An example of a very popular dance is “Savage” by Megan Thee Stallion.

“I honestly like to think that TikTok is a good distraction when I’m going through a lot of stress. The songs are catchy, and my brain focuses only on learning the dances. I’ve danced for 20 years and recently, with grad school, have not been able to dance as much as I used to,” said KulkarniI. “TikTok motivates me to go on and practice, in which case I just forget about everything like my assignments. It’s like rekindling a fire and being physically healthy.”

Although some students seem to only have good things to say about TikTok, some admitted that the app’s constant stream of content can feel repetitive.

“My least favorite part about TikTok is that I feel like everyone uses the same voice overs and music,” said Alexa Jones, a junior criminal justice major. “You could be scrolling through the ‘for you’ page and three videos in a row would all have the same music.”

Regardless of how repetitive TikTok may be, it doesn’t seem to stop students from scrolling through their “for you” page throughout their day, a page that is based off of algorithms to show users genres that they would most likely enjoy.  Users spend an average of 52 minutes per day on TikTok.

Some students claim that they have started to use TikTok more during the COVID-19 quarantine, as they have found themselves with an unusual amount of free time. 

“I think TikTok is more popular now due to the quarantine,” said junior psychology major, Dayana Escudero-Ambriz. “People have nothing to do, so they watch TikTok videos and also participate in making them.”

Students may also be spending more time on TikTok because of the amount of spare time they might have available, but it also seems to be helping them cope with the stresses of the nationwide quarantine.

“It definitely keeps me connected with the world, because there are all kinds of people around the world making TikToks. Especially now with the pandemic going on, there are a lot of videos about that,” said Jones. “It provides an escape from stress because there are some videos that are just so funny it definitely takes my mind off of what’s going on in the world right now.”

Jones said before the quarantine, she would typically spend an hour or so on TikTok, but now she spends up to three hours on the app because “there’s not much else to do.”

On the other hand, some students are spending less time on TikTok than they normally would because of the amount of stuff they have to do.

“I probably spend about two hours a day on TikTok, but I think since the quarantine I’ve spent less time on it because my professors are actually giving me more work to do,” said Ford.

Regardless of why students enjoy TikTok, it seems like the app is a medium where students can go to in order to connect with others, take their minds off of an inarguably chaotic world, and have a good laugh.

Tiktok has become very popular since August 2018, when ByteDance bought Musical.lyI and merged all of their accounts onto TikTok. In the United States alone, the number of adult TikTok users increased by 5.5 times over the past 18 months. Currently, there are at least 26.5 million active users each month in the United States, according to omnicoreagency.com.

TikTok is especially popular among high school or college-aged individuals. At least 41 percent of users are between 16 and 24 years old. 

Whether students are signing up for some lighthearted entertainment, using the app as a means of communicating with friends, or downloading it out of pure irony, TikTok is gaining popularity among young adults worldwide.

“I originally got the app as a joke, but I’d say my favorite part of TikTok is sending videos back and forth with my friends,” said Allison Ford, a junior early childhood education major. “It keeps us in contact even if we’re not actually having a conversation on the phone.”

Aside from keeping students in communication with friends, many say the app serves as a tool for forming new connections.

“I make TikToks maybe two or three times a week. I like making them because of the dancing, and it makes me feel like a part of a community,” said Mihika Milind KulkarniI, a graduate student studying clinical psychology. “I feel connected to people just by doing the same steps as they’re doing from across the globe.”

Some students prefer TikTok over other social media platforms because of its familiarity to the now-deleted app Vine. With its short videos and a seemingly endless stream of content, students say TikTok helps them wind down after a long day of school, or distract them from the harsh realities of day-to-day life.

“I like TikTok because the content really reminds me of Vine. It’s super addicting and entertaining, just like Vine was when it was around,” said senior criminal justice major Bryan Meyer. “I watch TikToks to take breaks from homework and before going to bed to relax a bit.” 

Not only can TikTok be a good tool to destress from a long day, but it can also get users’ bodies moving. For many, learning TikTok “dances” seems to be a fun way for some students to get their blood pumping and blow off some steam, while also doing what they love. An example of a very popular dance is “Savage” by Megan Thee Stallion.

“I honestly like to think that TikTok is a good distraction when I’m going through a lot of stress. The songs are catchy, and my brain focuses only on learning the dances. I’ve danced for 20 years and recently, with grad school, have not been able to dance as much as I used to,” said KulkarniI. “TikTok motivates me to go on and practice, in which case I just forget about everything like my assignments. It’s like rekindling a fire and being physically healthy.”

Although some students seem to only have good things to say about TikTok, some admitted that the app’s constant stream of content can feel repetitive.

“My least favorite part about TikTok is that I feel like everyone uses the same voice overs and music,” said Alexa Jones, a junior criminal justice major. “You could be scrolling through the ‘for you’ page and three videos in a row would all have the same music.”

Regardless of how repetitive TikTok may be, it doesn’t seem to stop students from scrolling through their “for you” page throughout their day, a page that is based off of algorithms to show users genres that they would most likely enjoy.  Users spend an average of 52 minutes per day on TikTok.

Some students claim that they have started to use TikTok more during the COVID-19 quarantine, as they have found themselves with an unusual amount of free time. 

“I think TikTok is more popular now due to the quarantine,” said junior psychology major, Dayana Escudero-Ambriz. “People have nothing to do, so they watch TikTok videos and also participate in making them.”

Students may also be spending more time on TikTok because of the amount of spare time they might have available, but it also seems to be helping them cope with the stresses of the nationwide quarantine.

“It definitely keeps me connected with the world, because there are all kinds of people around the world making TikToks. Especially now with the pandemic going on, there are a lot of videos about that,” said Jones. “It provides an escape from stress because there are some videos that are just so funny it definitely takes my mind off of what’s going on in the world right now.”

Jones said before the quarantine, she would typically spend an hour or so on TikTok, but now she spends up to three hours on the app because “there’s not much else to do.”

On the other hand, some students are spending less time on TikTok than they normally would because of the amount of stuff they have to do.

“I probably spend about two hours a day on TikTok, but I think since the quarantine I’ve spent less time on it because my professors are actually giving me more work to do,” said Ford.

Regardless of why students enjoy TikTok, it seems like the app is a medium where students can go to in order to connect with others, take their minds off of an inarguably chaotic world and have a good laugh.

“TikTok is just a place for me to go when I’m bored or need a good laugh because I know I’ll find funny videos and actually laugh out loud,” said Jones.



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