Cook County Clerk Breaks Down Political Future

Darlene Leal
Staff Reporter

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Cook County Clerk David Orr accompanied by Ralph Martire, Roosevelt’s Arthur Rubloff Professor of Public Policy and Public Administration for “The 2018 Election: What it means for our political future.” Photo courtesy of Roosevelt University’s Twitter page.

 

The American Dream Reconsidered Lecture series continued with a speech from Cook County Clerk, David Orr and Roosevelt’s Arthur Rubloff Professor of Public Policy and Public Administration, Ralph Martire.

Both were welcomed with applause. As soon as both were seated on stage, Martire told Orr he was thrilled to be joined by him. Martire breaks the “ice” by making a small playful jab at the mayor candidates.

“You’ve had a really interesting history here in Chicago. You’ve been an alderman, a mayor – In fact you might be the only qualified guy who’s not running for mayor right now,” Martire said.

Orr and Martire were very playful and knew how to work off one another. The crowd was thoroughly entertained by the duo and laughed throughout the lecture.

Martire shifted the conversation to the record sets by the recent elections and he asked for Orr’s opinion on those record changes.
“Just dramatic changes in early voting. The second big record was, um, on mail. As you know the past legislative allowed everyone to vote through mail. You know, for the same reason–since we do vote on a work day, we make it easy as possible” Orr said.

Martire inquired further about the turnout, which Orr then broke down.

“One, women. Women now voted in great numbers, but we talk about the year of the women. We saw the women candidates. Ok? Trump obviously the biggest factor both for and against him,” Orr said.

Martire then pointed out that this year’s congress is the most diverse, “This freshman class of congress is going to be unique. It will be the most diverse and the most female freshman class in history. We have at least four openly LGBT candidates got elected,” Martire said. “The first ever woman Muslim, actually two were elected into congress. First ever woman Native American, actually two and one of them who is openly gay– elected into congress.”

Martire compares that to the less diverse senate and Martire then asks Orr for his opinion on the Senate. He also noted the fact that they earned more republican seats.

Orr responded saying that there is a lack of democracy and how democrats have to fight for more seats. Orr made sure to state that he isn’t asking for a senate full of democrats but instead he believes the system should represent the public.

He further stated that there’s a divisiveness within the politics between the two. Which Orr responded with by talking about the issues that both parties normally focus on. Democrats would focus on issues such as equity pay for women, minimum wage, the infrastructure and the other “bread and butter” issues. While republicans have to discuss moderating their approach in different regards, such as the tax breaks and their image as “right wing.”

“There is an opportunity for compromise, um, it depends on how many republicans frankly get scared as we get closer to 2020 that they’ll all go down,” Orr said. They said that issues was seen in Illinois with the change to blue.

Chicago was brought up for its negative connotation in regards to the following political issues: racism, police, lack of accountability, schools and affordable policy. Orr discussed the deep rooted racism taught to the CPD and their enforcement in keeping black people in certain areas.

Orr said he blamed most issues that Chicago has on inequality and the lack of opportunities offered. Although, it shouldn’t be used the way it was used, Orr commended Rahm’s use of the tax increment financing (TIF) money. Rahm used TIF money for public facilities, such as the schools. Orr is hoping for the best in the upcoming years.

It was then switched over to questions. Professor Margaret Rung, director of the Center for New Deal Studies, asked Orr the last question of the lecture in regards to the judges and how one was rejected.

Senior psychology major Cora Merriman, attended to get Orr’s perspective of the election. Merriman seemed to have a positive perspective on the lecture.

“It turned out really well. We have new things to look forward to,” Merriman said.  Merriman did learn something knew from the lecture, which was related to Professor Rung’s question. Merriman was unaware of the rejection of the judge and was surprised to hear that. No further comments were made about that result.

The American Dream Reconsidered Lecture series continued with a speech from Cook County Clerk, David Orr and Roosevelt’s Arthur Rubloff Professor of Public Policy and Public Administration, Ralph Martire.

Both were welcomed with applause. As soon as both were seated on stage, Martire told Orr he was thrilled to be joined by him. Martire breaks the “ice” by making a small playful jab at the mayor candidates.

“You’ve had a really interesting history here in Chicago. You’ve been an alderman, a mayor – In fact you might be the only qualified guy who’s not running for mayor right now,” Martire said.

Orr and Martire were very playful and knew how to work off one another. The crowd was thoroughly entertained by the duo and laughed throughout the lecture.

Martire shifted the conversation to the record sets by the recent elections and he asked for Orr’s opinion on those record changes.
“Just dramatic changes in early voting. The second big record was, um, on mail. As you know the past legislative allowed everyone to vote through mail. You know, for the same reason–since we do vote on a work day, we make it easy as possible” Orr said.

Martire inquired further about the turnout, which Orr then broke down.

“One, women. Women now voted in great numbers, but we talk about the year of the women. We saw the women candidates. Ok? Trump obviously the biggest factor both for and against him,” Orr said.

Martire then pointed out that this year’s congress is the most diverse, “This freshman class of congress is going to be unique. It will be the most diverse and the most female freshman class in history. We have at least four openly LGBT candidates got elected,” Martire said. “The first ever woman Muslim, actually two were elected into congress. First ever woman Native American, actually two and one of them who is openly gay– elected into congress.”

Martire compares that to the less diverse senate and Martire then asks Orr for his opinion on the Senate. He also noted the fact that they earned more republican seats.

Orr responded saying that there is a lack of democracy and how democrats have to fight for more seats. Orr made sure to state that he isn’t asking for a senate full of democrats but instead he believes the system should represent the public.

He further stated that there’s a divisiveness within the politics between the two. Which Orr responded with by talking about the issues that both parties normally focus on. Democrats would focus on issues such as equity pay for women, minimum wage, the infrastructure and the other “bread and butter” issues. While republicans have to discuss moderating their approach in different regards, such as the tax breaks and their image as “right wing.”

“There is an opportunity for compromise, um, it depends on how many republicans frankly get scared as we get closer to 2020 that they’ll all go down,” Orr said. They said that issues was seen in Illinois with the change to blue.

Chicago was brought up for its negative connotation in regards to the following political issues: racism, police, lack of accountability, schools and affordable policy. Orr discussed the deep rooted racism taught to the CPD and their enforcement in keeping black people in certain areas.

Orr said he blamed most issues that Chicago has on inequality and the lack of opportunities offered. Although, it shouldn’t be used the way it was used, Orr commended Rahm’s use of the tax increment financing (TIF) money. Rahm used TIF money for public facilities, such as the schools. Orr is hoping for the best in the upcoming years.

It was then switched over to questions. Professor Margaret Rung, director of the Center for New Deal Studies, asked Orr the last question of the lecture in regards to the judges and how one was rejected.

Senior psychology major Cora Merriman, attended to get Orr’s perspective of the election. Merriman seemed to have a positive perspective on the lecture.

“It turned out really well. We have new things to look forward to,” Merriman said.  Merriman did learn something knew from the lecture, which was related to Professor Rung’s question. Merriman was unaware of the rejection of the judge and was surprised to hear that. No further comments were made about that result.



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