tom hardy

Pop Culture Radar: What’s Trending This Week

By Samantha Reid
samonthetorch@gmail.com

Books
blood will out

‘Blood Will Out: The True Story of a Murder, a Mystery and a Masquerade’
In a true story of murder and intrigue, writer Walter Kirn tells the unlikely story of his 15-year friendship with an imposter of epic proportions — Christian Gerhartsreiter, better known by his alias Clark Rockefeller. Described as “an ‘In Cold Blood’ for our time,” Kirn’s true-crime memoir is a must for anyone who loves a good mystery story.

Continue reading

jason-derulo-talk-dirty

Pop Culture Radar: What’s Trending This Week

By Samantha Reid
samonthetorch@gmail.com

Books
eleanor and park
Rainbow Rowell’s ‘Eleanor & Park’
It may have been released a year ago, but Rainbow Rowell’s book is still receiving a lot of buzz. So much so, in fact, that Dreamworks just bought the rights to turn the story into a movie that will begin filming in 2015. For those who haven’t read it yet, “Eleanor & Park” is part traditional teen love story, park awkward coming-of-age story. Fans say what sets it apart is the realistic characters that keep readers coming back for more.

Continue reading

Human_Trafficking_Infographic_4-238x1024.png (courtesy of Rescue-Freedom)

Rescue:Freedom part of international fight to end human trafficking

By Madelyn Olsen
rutorchnews@gmail.com

Human_Trafficking_Infographic_4-238x1024.png (courtesy of Rescue-Freedom)

It just takes one time.
A 15-year-old former sex slave, previously kept in a cage, with cigarette burns all over her body, is now experiencing the joy and love that every child should experience. It only takes one time to see this, and one cannot possibly remain numb to the issue of human trafficking.

Continue reading

Drug picture - Courtesy digitaltrends.com

Roosevelt hosts fourth Annual Forum on Drug Policy

By Joelle Tatter
rutorchnews@gmail.com

Drug picture - Courtesy digitaltrends.com

Roosevelt University’s fourth Annual Forum on Drug Policy was held in Fainman Lounge on April 4. There were two panels, the first titled “Inside and Outside the Walls: Perspectives on Individuals who Use Drugs, Treatment and the Correctional System,” and the second titled “Dire Consequences: Collateral Consequences of Marijuana Misdemeanors.”

Continue reading

greek week alpha gamma delta (EDITED, Best I could do)

Roosevelt’s first Greek Week brings fraternities, sororities together for awareness

By Samantha Reid
samonthetorch@gmail.com

greek week alpha gamma delta (EDITED, Best I could do)

Greek life may not be the first thing that comes to mind when people think of Roosevelt University, but that doesn’t stop the group of Greek organizations on campus from putting time and effort into their organizations.
In an attempt to bolster awareness and support for Greek life on campus, several organizations are teaming up for the university’s first ever Greek Week, to take place April 21-24. The goal of the week of events is to bring together the nine Greek organizations currently on campus.

Continue reading

Geddes2.jpg_Photo by Dominika Koziol

Canadian poet Gary Geddes reads at Gage Gallery, inspires students to write

By Dominika Koziol
rutorchnews@gmail.com

Geddes2.jpg_Photo by Dominika Koziol

In his second visit to Roosevelt University, Canadian poet Gary Geddes was the star attraction of a public reading at the Gage Gallery on April 2.
Geddes has written prolifically and received accolades such as the British Columbia Lieutenant Governor’s Award for Literary Excellence in 2008.
English Department Chair Larry Howe introduced Geddes as “the most prolific writer we’ve hosted. He does it all, and he does it all extremely well.”
Howe also praised Geddes as a both “a Canadian writer and a global citizen” who made “social justice more than a mission statement.”

Continue reading

Sexual Awareness

Roosevelt recognizes Sexual Assault Awareness Month

By Meredith Dobes
rutorchnews@gmail.com

Sexual Awareness

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and in its recognition, Roosevelt University hosted a variety of events April 9 where students, faculty and staff could participate in a dialogue about sexual violence in society and on campus.

Continue reading

Heisler Goldrich - courtesy roosevelt.edu

The history of CCPA’s Vivid: 1990s to today

By Daniel Johanson
rutorchnews@gmail.com

Heisler Goldrich - courtesy roosevelt.edu

The annual performance known as Vivid allows the entirety of the Chicago College of Performing Arts to reach across departmental borders to showcase what the university has to offer. Vivid 2014, which will be held April 8 at 7:30 p.m., will mostly highlight vocal works of both the operatic and theatrical spheres.
The performance usually brings in between 1500 and 2000 audience members and takes place in the historic Auditorium Theatre.

Continue reading

Citizen J - courtesy artificebooks.com

Poetry of ‘Citizen J’ outwits attempts at understanding

By Ian Kreml
rutorchnews@gmail.com

Citizen J - courtesy artificebooks.com

Daniela Olszewska’s “Citizen J” is not so much poetry as it is a complex set of word riddles, available only to those with the ability to find humor within the subtleties of abstraction.
Each poem gives us insight into the cartoonistic Citizen J, who is often presented through intense imagery such as: “j’s main membrane / trembles like a cello string,” and “she wants ambulances to chase her for a change.”

Continue reading

Stephen Colbert responds to Twitter - Stephen Colbert - Wikimedia Commons

Stephen Colbert responds to Twitter controversy with trademark satire

By Shawn Gakhal
shawnonthetorch@gmail.com

Stephen Colbert responds to Twitter - Stephen Colbert - Wikimedia Commons
The hashtag #CancelColbert trended worldwide last week when Stephen Colbert’s TV Twitter account tweeted an offensive remark about the Asian community.
The tweet read: “I am willing to show #Asian community I care by introducing the Ching-Chong-Ding-Dong Foundation for Sensitivity to Orientals or Whatever.”
Twitter activist Suey Park created the hashtag #CancelColbert and sparked the movement to get the show cancelled.
“White people—please keep #CancelColbert trending until there’s an apology,” Park’s tweet read. “This is NOT the burden of people of color. Fix it. Do something.”

Continue reading

Comicon Attendees

SPEED’s first Comic Con brings nerd culture to Spring Week

By Joelle Tatter
rutorchnews@gmail.com

Comicon Attendees
Students Planning for Enrichment, Enlightenment and Development kicked off its annual Welcome Spring Week on March 31 with Roosevelt University’s very own Comic Con in the Goodmen Center.
Batman and his nemesis, the Joker, were present the entire time entertaining people, as Spider-Man swung over from his universe to say, “Hello.” Popular music played throughout the event, and guests had the chance to race each other in the “Adrenalize Rush,” which was an inflatable obstacle course, or challenge each other on “Wrecking Ball,” an inflatable on which four people stood in a circle on a raised platform and tried to knock each other off by tossing an inflatable wrecking ball at each other.
People drifted in and out, many of them curious about the event, others showing their support.
“I heard about it from a friend,” sophomore Jeremy Sheard said. “It sounded like a good way to show school spirit.”
Junior Allyssa Hankins explained that because the idea of a Comic Con at Roosevelt sounded appealing, she decided she couldn’t miss the opportunity to go.
“I am a nerd,” she said. “I love movies, especially ‘nerd’ movies, and when I heard [about] Comic Con, I decided I had to go.”
After the games, Batman and the Joker came up to answer questions, which were many and varied. At the end of the day, they had one final showdown, during which the Joker ended up taking a hostage and held her as ransom for the “money” placed in a stack behind Batman.
The ensuing fight ended with the hostage’s release back, safe and sound, with the Joker down on the ground, bruised and hurting, as Batman saved the day once again, and the audience cheered.
While certainly a lot of fun, Comic Cons aren’t the most well-known of events, despite having gained popularity over the past 10 years.
Erika Rainey-Williams, the sophomore student behind the event, explained why she choose to host this for SPEED.
“It’s in honor of Spring Week as a thing to do to celebrate the first week of spring,” she said. “I thought it would be something a little more original than what most schools do. I know and love nerd culture, so I thought this would be fun.”
Spring Week continued the festivities with Stomps and Prompts on Tuesday, a Massage Day on Wednesday and a Youtube Showcase on Thursday.

Life-After-College-Book-Cover-691x1024

Pop Culture Radar: What’s Trending This Week

By Samantha Reid
rutorchnews@gmail.com

Books
Life-After-College-Book-Cover-691x1024
‘Life After College’
Ever wish there was a manual for how to become a fully functioning adult? Well, there kind of is. Life coach Jenny Blake wrote a comprehensive guide to everything from career to dating to health, helping to make the postgrad transition a little bit easier. Not many people can afford their own personal life coach, but this motivational guidebook is the next best thing.

book-of-jonah

Joshua Max Feldman’s ‘The Book of Jonah’
This isn’t the average biblical retelling. It starts in modern day New York City, where lawyer Jonah Jacobstein has a seemingly perfect life. Perfect, that is, until he has a vision of the city being destroyed. This throws his life onto an entirely new trajectory, which lands him as an aimless traveler of the world. Chock full of twists and turns, Feldman’s novel certainly never leaves readers bored.

TV

MTV Movie Awards
Get the popcorn ready, because Sunday, April 13 marks this year’s MTV Movie Awards, and there’s a lot to see. The excitement will start early during the pre-show with an exclusive clip of the highly anticipated film “The Fault in Our Stars.” Leo may not have gotten his Oscar this year, but he could still get a golden popcorn for his work in “Wolf of Wall Street.” Other notable nominees include Jennifer Lawrence and Amy Adams for best kiss in “American Hustle,’ the cast of “Anchorman 2” for best fight and Benedict Cumberbatch for best villain in “Star Trek: Into Darkness.”

mad men
‘Mad Men’ Final Season
The beginning of the end for AMC’s hit “Mad Men” also airs on April 13. Similar to the final season of “Breaking Bad,” AMC split season seven of the story into two parts, with seven episodes airing this spring followed by the remaining seven in 2015. The season promises a lot of drama, as season six ended with complete disorder in Don Draper’s life. Viewers can tune in Sunday to see how Jon Hamm’s character deals with his suspension from work and separation from his wife.

Movies
hateship-loveship_poster
‘Hateship, Loveship’
Kristen Wiig can do funny better than almost anyone, but in this film, she tries drama for the first time opposite Academy Award nominee Hailee Steinfeld. Also starring Nick Nolte and Guy Pearce, the movie follows the story of Steinfeld as she sparks a faux romance between her addict father and her new nanny, played by Wiig. “Hateship, Loveship” will see a limited release on April 11.

the hobbit
‘The Hobbit’ on DVD
“Lord of the Rings” fans can finally take home “The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug” on DVD and Blu-ray April 8. Reviews after the theatrical release were mostly positive, with the Los Angeles Times saying it put the entire Hobbit series “back on course.” It did so well, in fact, that it made the top 25 highest grossing films of all time. Even for those who aren’t LOTR superfans, the film has action, dragons and Orlando Bloom, making it worth a watch.

Media
jared-leto-flaunt-magazine-2014-7
Jared Leto on the cover of Flaunt
Jared Leto and his enviable ombre locks have been seemingly everywhere lately. From his heartfelt Oscar speech to the cover of Flaunt magazine’s April issue, Leto is a Hollywood force to be reckoned with. The actor and frontman of Thirty Seconds to Mars clearly has no fear in taking on high-drama roles, telling the lifestyle mag, “I’m willing to risk everything. I don’t say that with any conceits. I say that as a fact.”

2048
Tired of Flappy Bird and looking for a new Internet game time-suck? Online and mobile game 2048 was created just this past March by 19-year-old Gabriele Cirulli, and it’s already taken off. The original version asks players to slide numbered tiles, combining them with the ultimate goal of creating the number 2048. But less number-oriented versions are springing up everywhere — there’s Doctor Who 2048, multi-player 2048 and, best of all, Doge2048.

Music
ingrid_michaelson_lights_out
Ingrid Michaelson ‘Lights Out’
Indie-pop singer-songwriter Ingrid Michaelson has a new album release coming April 14. The first single, “Girls Chase Boys,” came out in February, and her tour to promote the album will begin in late April. Critics have called the first song off the album a “a darker, more complicated side of the singer” who rose to fame with happy hits like “Be OK” and “The Way I Am.” Michaelson herself has promised a more experimental vibe to the new album, but with some of her old sound mixed in.

john-legend
John Legend in concert
Famous crooner John Legend will perform at the Cadillac Palace Theatre in Chicago on April 9. The nine-time Grammy winner will take the stage to sing songs from his latest album “Love in the Future,” largely inspired by model wife Chrissy Teigen. Fans who attend the show are promised an “up-close-and-personal experience” in the intimate theatre setting, and Legend is sure to perform his chart-topping hit “All of Me.”

ETC
Chris Sale
Bacon and baseball
Ever been at a baseball game and thought, “This experience needs more bacon?” The White Sox are meeting that need with their new menu and then some. This season, park patrons can order from an extensive new concessions menu that includes a bacon mac and cheeseburger as well as bacon on a stick. For dessert fans, the franchise is also boasting a 12-scoop ice cream sundae that weighs in at a full three pounds, as well as a chicken-and-waffle sandwich. One thing’s for sure: regardless of how the team does, fans at U.S. Cellular won’t be going hungry this season.

boat tour
Boat tour season has begun
It’s only just begun to warm up in Chicago, but spring has sprung for boat tours. Both the cruise ships on Navy Pier and the tour boats on the Chicago River have held their 2014 inaugural trips, and they will continue rain or shine (or freezing cold). Cruises off Navy Pier can be pretty pricey, but offer dinner, drinks and dancing all with an unparalleled skyline view. The Wendella architecture tour may seem like it’s just for tourists, but it takes even natives to see the city from a new viewpoint. Word to the wise? Check sites like LivingSocial and Groupon for the best deals.

writing graphic copy

New writing minor introduced for fall 2014

By Dominika Koziol
rutorchnews@gmail.com

writing graphic copy

A new writing minor, offered by Roosevelt University’s English Program, will be offered in the fall, available to students of all majors. Students will no longer have to analyze Shakespeare to acquire sought-after communication skills.
The move to create the minor is due, in part, to employers looking for applicants with strong writing skills. A survey by the Association of American Colleges and Universities from 2013 found that, of 318 employers, 80 percent said colleges should have a stronger focus on written and oral communication.
Conversations about creating this minor became serious a year and a half ago. Faculty from the English department collaborated with composition faculty and the Department of Communications to create a minor designed as a six core sequence with two core classes.
One 300-level course is required, but students have flexibility in developing the direction of the minor. The core classes are Writing 160 and English 153. Writing 160 teaches students about the art of persuasion and rhetoric, with a focus on writing for social change while English 153 is an introduction to creative writing. After completing the core, students can choose whether to focus on professional writing or creative writing classes.
Faculty worked to make this minor available to improve students’ chances at success in the job market. Many articles, appearing in reputable publications like the Chronicle of Higher Education, about the importance of writing skills had come to their attention.
Director of the Writing Center Carrie Brecke, one of the faculty members who was involved in creating the minor, said that students were asking for an opportunity of this sort.
“Majors were just all over the place — marketing, psychology, science majors,” she said. “They really wanted to concentrate on writing about the world in a professional way.”
Other courses currently available in the minor have titles like Writing about Ideas, Intro to Fiction Writing, Screen Writing and Media Writing. This list reveals that the current course selection is a diverse mix of creative and professional writing.
As the minor develops, other interdisciplinary courses such as Writing for the Sciences or Writing for Business may be added.
According to Larry Howe, chair of the Department of Literature and Languages, the department is still looking for input from people from around the university.
“We want courses that can be cross listed and interdisciplinary,” he said. “Other people in various disciplines can approach us to consult with them on how to develop their course. Anyone’s who’s interested, we’d love to work with them.”
There are also plans to find two new faculty members with experience doing and teaching professional and technical writing.
Howe commented on which students could take advantage of this minor.
“Anyone and everyone,” he said. “You always need to be able to account for yourself in writing — for example, when you draft a letter seeking a position. And students who study other disciplines don’t necessarily write very well.”
This minor aims to help students in disciplines like science or psychology to sharpen the writing skills they will need on the job, even if they are not exposed to writing-intensive courses in their respective majors.
“I have a sneaking hunch that honors students will be particularly interested in this,” Brecke said. “But also just students who are interested in writing and want more of a concentration on that then they’re getting. They see it as a way to get ahead in terms of understanding their own thoughts, being able to articulate their position and being able to position themselves in the world in places like marketing or a nonprofit organization.”

Turkey Bans Twitter - Wikimedia Commons

Turkey unbans Twitter days after local election, YouTube ban still intact

By Shawn Gakhal
shawnonthetorch@gmail.com

Turkey Bans Twitter - Wikimedia Commons

Turkey’s telecommunication authority (TIB) unbanned Twitter last Thursday, just days after local elections took place in the country.
TIB banned Twitter more than two weeks ago when phone calls between senior officials leaked to the site. The audio recordings were originally posted to YouTube, which was also recently blocked in the country.
Another video was recently posted on YouTube that depicted high-ranking officials talking about possible military conflict with Syria, which led to the website’s banning on March 27.
A source within the Turkish Prime Minister’s office told Reuters that the leaked audio recordings pose an issue to national security.
This isn’t the first time Turkey has had issues with social media.
Turkey banned YouTube back in 2007, even though the site was still accessible through other channels. Turkey officially lifted the YouTube ban in 2010.
David Faris, assistant professor of political science at Roosevelt University, is an expert on the Middle East and digital media.
The Torch landed an exclusive interview with Faris, who is currently vacationing in Turkey, and he talked about the ban of Twitter and YouTube, local elections and the political atmosphere in Turkey.

Q: What kind of effects did the banning of Twitter and YouTube have on the Turkish voting electorate regarding the flow of information? What’s being done to free up those websites?
A: The effects of these bans are difficult to discern. Twitter and YouTube are not news sites per se, but rather conduits for sharing information. Not being able to access Twitter was one of the first things I noticed when I arrived here, and the blockage of these sites is very real.
However, there are quite simple workarounds, and the most popular one here seems to be the VPN — the Virtual Private Network. …Twitter itself also provided very simple instructions on how to Tweet using SMS. On one reading, all the government is doing is teaching people how to circumvent online censorship. It’s one thing to block opposition websites, but to take down these two incredibly popular platforms means that even casual, non-political Internet users are probably going to try to circumvent. This is not to say that they had no effect. If nothing else, it meant people were talking more about Internet censorship than they were about corruption.

Q: Did the move to ban these two, highly popular social media sites have anything to do with the charges of corruption leveled against Prime Minister Erdogan?
A: The blocking of Twitter and YouTube was suspiciously timed and seemed to happen in response to allegations of corruption at the very top of the Erdogan regime. While it’s impossible to say for sure, I’d say it was less to do with the corruption per se and more about establishing control of the narrative prior to the elections.

Q: With local elections taking place and anti-government protests, seemingly, widespread, what is the general feel and mood of the Turkish people? Is it positive or negative?
A: To be clear, Erdogan’s party has not been re-elected yet. These were local, mayoral elections across the country and had no bearing on the balance of power in parliament. Like with 24/7 media everywhere, I would argue that the results of this election are being blown a bit out of proportion, since it is possible that local factors may have outweighed any frustration with Erdogan at the top. But it is evidence that we have to be careful about assuming that protests in capital cities led by young people are indicative of wider frustrations.
Assuming these elections were free and fair, the dissatisfaction felt by the opposition is not necessarily shared by the broader public. While things felt a bit tense on election night, the mood here seems just fine and not at all like Egypt did on the verge of the 2011 uprising.

Q: Is there a risk of a polarization of the Turkish people if Erdogan stays in power? If so, is this a similar situation to Mubarak in Egypt back in 2008?
A: Certainly, many of Erdogan’s moves are worrisome, and look like what we in political science call “democratic backsliding.” In this case, as in Venezuela, you have a legitimately elected leader using all kinds of tools — media control, censorship, corruption — to enhance his own power and his party’s power at the expense of the opposition and at the expense of democratic legitimacy.
However, Turkey is no Egypt. This is a much more prosperous, modern society and I would expect that any further moves toward centralizing power or censoring media will be met with a harsh and vigorous reaction from the opposition. The only way I see a Tahrir scenario unfolding here is if Erdogan alters his party’s rules and runs for a fourth term, or if he runs for president, as expected, and changes the office from a largely ceremonial one to a stronger, more imperial institution.

20140402_140300

Is Roosevelt’s prayer room discouraging students from prayer or simply apathetic?

By Kristine Bearss
rutorchnews@gmail.com

20140402_140300

With all of the stress that comes with the end of the semester dwindling down, many students find that meditation and moments of reflection are a great way to refocus the drive to finish out the year strong.
There are a lot of ways in which Roosevelt University promotes healthy mental practices such as this, including promotion of the Academic Success Center and the Counseling Center. Last month, there was even a flyer released for the university’s very own Prayer and Reflection Room.
The flyer did not give any information about who to call for more information about the prayer room, so it took time to do a little digging. Student Services did not know who was in charge of the room, and one person in the office did not know the university had a prayer room.
The Center for Student Involvement said the person who established the room does not work at the university any longer.
In fact, the room was set up simply to appease some students who had a push to include the room on campus.
The fancy TV billboard in the Wabash Lobby advertises the room being in AUD 1258. However, herein lies the problem. According to an archived news piece put out by the Torch in 2012, when the room originally was set up, it was located in AUD 703. The fact that the room has now been moved to the tower is somewhat disconcerting.
Typically freshmen and sophomores do not know how to get to the tower in the Auditorium Building. The Auditorium Building is enough of a winding maze of staircases which lead to nowhere, as it is. Getting to the tower is especially tricky if you are unfamiliar with the premises.
The reason this is upsetting is because freshmen and sophomores are going to feel the biggest disconnect from friends and family and might need a special place to go to in order to reflect and refocus themselves. By making this room so impossibly hidden, it almost defeats the purpose of having it.
After a few tries to access the prayer room and some direction to the tower’s elevator, I found the room locked.
It seems to be that a room designed for students to have privacy and reflect, meditate and regroup should not cause anxiety just to enter — why even have the room in that case?
A kind janitor opened the room for me. The small room contains two chairs, a small table and a coat rack facing two windows.
As the light poured through the windows and I began to reflect on what this room means to the students of Roosevelt, I began to wonder why it is so important to have a place where students can go in order to connect with a spiritual part of themselves.
My conclusion is this: if you know in your heart that you need a place to pray, meditate, reflect or whatever your needs, then your school should absolutely be a place where you can feel safe and comfortable to do this.
Moving the prayer room to the tower might have been out of pure necessity. Perhaps it was out of consideration to provide a windowed room for prayer. However, the lack of signage and promotion of this room in comparison to other student involvement programs still seems to have negative connotations.
Certainly it is important that the school does not promote one religion over another. In fact, this room does not even need to be for students who are religious at all.
It seems curious that the university would provide a room that, for all intents and purposes, is a really great idea, yet, no staff is aware of who is in charge of preserving it or how it works. Not to mention, most students who I asked about their feelings on the room are surprised to hear that it exists. I am not here to bash the university’s policies or say it is doing a bad job.
But a little ownership and maintenance of something that can add a lot of character to our school would make people who are outsiders here, or just feeling a little lost, know that the university cares about going the extra mile in order to promote happy and healthy students.

Waiting1

‘Lifescape: A Video Portrait of Marshall Bennett’ connects face, story to co-founder of Institute of Real Estate

By Brittany Keeperman

Waiting1

“Lifescape: A Video Portrait of Marshall Bennett” premiered April 3 at the Heller College of Business at the Marshall Bennett Institute of Real Estate.
Bija Bennett, producer of the installation and daughter of Marshall Bennett, darted from room to room greeting friends and relatives as photographers snapped photos.
Many who know Marshall Bennett were looking forward to the film.
“Marshall is an extraordinarily smart, funny and generous person,” said John Wallach, Bennett’s nephew. “I’ve known him since I was born, just about, and he’s been interesting for me to talk to.”
Wallach added that he was looking forward to the film and noted that Biija Bennet spent quite a bit of effort putting the project together, even kicking off the event with a speech.
Thirty-seven years ago, Marshall Bennett suffered an accident that put him into a coma, his daughter said.
“He had to learn to walk and talk all over again,” she said.
Bija Bennett said that it was the accident that made discovering more about her father and exploring the rich heritage he’s brought to her, important.
“Listen to your parents, your children [and] your loved ones,” she said. “Really listen to them and have them listen to you. … In one moment, life changes, and you can never get it back again.”
Bija Bennett expressed the meaning of the film to her father.
“This film is an expression of my love for you, Dad,” Bennett said, gesturing to her father.
“Thank you for showing me how to live and how to age, with dignity, energy and grace. … No regrets.”
The video project was put together in collaboration with artist Lincoln Schatz, whose work has been shown internationally. Ken Olsen, the assistant principal cellist for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, produced the sound-score for the film and performed Bach at the reception before the video premiered.
The 14-minute shortened version of the video project played on no fewer than five screens throughout the 12th floor, yet still, people craned their necks to see over the crowd.
After the premier, President Charles Middleton spoke, joined by Newton Minnow and, of course, the guest of honor Marshall Bennett. The video documentary then returned on loop for the remainder of the evening.
“I thought it was lovely to have a personal account, a documentary on the person that’s connected with the school so the students really can see it’s a real person, and how his life developed and how he got into the field,” said Meredith Palmer, a private art dealer who came in from New York, and old friend of Bennett.
The instillation is now open to students, faculty and the general public at the Heller College of Business on the 12th floor of Roosevelt’s Wabash building, weekdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The video project can also be viewed at http://www.BijaB.com.

Legging Ban - courtesy thedailybeast.com

Local Evanston middle school tries to ban leggings, confuses teenaged girls

By Shawn Gakhal
shawnonthetorch@gmail.com

Legging Ban - courtesy thedailybeast.com

Last week, Haven Middle School in Evanston, Il. temporarily banned leggings, yoga pants and any kind of bottoms of that ilk.
Parents became concerned that the particular clothing in question was “too distracting to boys.”
Yes, that was their reason.
The temporary ban was soon overturned, as girls could again start wearing their camouflage and floral-printed leggings and yoga pants
But there was a caveat: the girls would now have to wear a skirt, shirt or a pair of shorts over the leggings and yoga pants should they choose to wear them.
For shame, Haven Middle School, for shame.
Where have we gotten in society when a girl can’t just wear leggings and yoga pants and be left alone?
What would our forefathers think of this ruling?
I can’t say for certain, but I’m positive that George Washington would be 99 percent against this.
But Shawn, you’re a guy, what would you know about leggings and yoga pants?
Good question.
Not too much, which is why I canvassed Roosevelt University to gage the thoughts of those who actually wear leggings and yoga pants: girls!
“That’s so stupid,” junior Amanda Kassel said. “I can wear what I want to wear and nobody should tell me differently. They’re comfortable, cheap and they’re everywhere in every store. If I want to wear leggings, I’m going to wear leggings.”
When told that the girls of Haven Middle School will have to wear a skirt, shirt or a pair of shorts over leggings or yoga pants, Kassel expressed a bit of confusion.
“I personally would not want to wear that,” Kassel said. “It’s not my style, and I feel like it’s more of a hassle to wear shorts over pants. They’re [leggings] not, necessarily, tights. Tights and leggings are two completely different things.”
Senior Nila Brown agreed with the Kassel’s sentiment.
“Tights are more see-through,” Brown said. “I guess it depends on your shape, also. Maybe that’s the reason. And then we have the young boys, and they’re sexual. … Maybe that’s the real problem here.”
However, Brown said that she would be in favor of restricting certain types of clothing to girls depending on the age range.
“If that is the reason, I would support it for that age range,” Brown said. “But other than that, no, it’s not a problem.”
Sure, there’s an argument to be made that young girls of a certain age shouldn’t be wearing tight, revealing clothes. That’s a legit concern for parents, which is totally warranted.
However, personal freedom is important and infringing on one’s right to feel comfortable and confident in their own clothes shouldn’t have the price of it’s “too distracting to boys.”
When Sophomore Paulina Villagomez heard of the news, she said, “Yoga pants, really? I’m thinking like ‘What is wrong with girls wearing leggings and yoga pants in middle school?’”
Villagomez understood why middle school girls wearing leggings might be an issue, but saw no problem with yoga pants.
“Yoga pants are yoga pants,” she said. “They’re just tight pants. So, are they going to make these girls not wear tight jeans either, now? What’s the difference between tight jeans and yoga pants?”
I bet you didn’t know that the origin of leggings trace all the way back to 13th century Europe, where both men and women wore them to protect themselves from cold winter weather. Girls who choose to wear leggings might wear them for a multitude of reasons, and trying to list them all in this column would be an exercise in purposelessness.
That’s because each girl may have a different reason for wearing leggings or yoga pants, and taking the ability to express oneself away is equal to stealing identities.
The reason that leggings and yoga pants might be “too distracting to boys” isn’t a good enough reason to impose a dress code.
“I think that they’re more comfortable than sweatpants,” Kassel said. “They don’t really get in the way. I wear them all the time.”

Princess - Use This One!

Scorch Stories

Student files for ‘conscious uncoupling’ from Sallie Mae
By Faf Suh

Last week, actress Gwyneth Paltrow and Coldplay frontman Chris Martin announced their “conscious uncoupling” after 10 years of marriage. This week, a Roosevelt University junior announced her “conscious uncoupling” from student loan provider Sallie Mae.
“I figure if celebrities can do it, why can’t I?” said the student, who wishes to remain anonymous. “It’s been a long three years with Sallie, but we just don’t mesh anymore. I was young when our relationship started. I didn’t know what I was getting into.”
Sallie Mae provides student loans to students all over the country, something our anonymous source said is not okay with her.
“If a man cheats on his wife, that’s grounds for a divorce,” she told the Scorch. “So, if Sallie Mae is providing loans for students other than me, I think that qualifies me for conscious uncoupling. I need a one-woman student loan provider.”
The student seemed unconcerned with how she will pay her tuition bills in her final year of undergrad without the help of Mae.
There are some other options for students looking to finance an education.
“I’m thinking of signing up on one of those sugar babies websites,” the student said. “At least those guys can pay my bills without a nine percent interest rate.”

President Middleton receives big raise, staff quits
By C.S. Vonnegut

In a move most people semi-expected, Roosevelt University President Charles Middleton got a $2,774,689 raise to his previous $725,311, which puts his salary at $3.5 million and makes him the highest paid college president, mostly so he could stay ahead of University of Chicago President Robert Zimmer’s $3.4 million.
Following the raise, most faculty and staff resigned.
The Scorch recently got a chance to sit down with Middleton to talk to him about his recent influx of cash.

Q: How do you feel about the entire staff quitting due to your raise?
A: It’s an unfortunate situation, but we will continue to stay strong. Roosevelt was founded on the perseverance of the human spirit when trouble overcomes you, and that is what I intend to do.

Q: Have you considered taking a pay cut?
A: LOL. Next question.

Q: With admissions down and the school in debt, how can you justify receiving a raise this substantial?
A: Times are tough. I know it as well as anyone. My driver forgot to pick me up this morning, so I had to take the CTA, and it smelled like urine. It’s easy to forget to stay positive in this economy, but the goal is to try. Do I think I should have gotten the raise? That’s a hard question to answer. But yes. And I just want to say, in your face, Zimmer.

Q: And how do you justify it?
A: It’s not up to me how much I make. It’s up to the board. If they think I should receive a raise, then there is nothing I can do but accept it. They are very persuasive. It’s simple, really.

Q: Correct me if i’m wrong, but aren’t you the sole member of the board at this point?
A: It starts with one.That’s what this school is all about. It only takes one person to change the world.

Q: …Moving on, what are your future plans for Roosevelt?
A: I don’t know, to be honest. I figured I’d stay in the Wabash Building for a while. It’s really cool when it’s empty, you know? Running around the halls and stuff and playing hide-and-go-seek with my friends. I’ll probably sell off the building once I get board and pocket the change. I’ve been eyeing a new yacht for a while now. …Cha-ching! Am i right?

While the future remains bleak for the university, Middleton seems to be having a great time. Also, this will be our last issue, as we’ve run out of funds to continue printing.

To reduce budget deficit, RU begins selling old merchandise, personnel on Craigslist
By Miriam Tate

In a final sigh of resignation about the budget deficit, Roosevelt University decided to sell aging furniture, books, appliances, electronics and even some faculty and staff members on Craigslist.
Some of the entries include “~Gently Used, Mildly Dusty Library Furniture AMAZING!!~,” “Bathroom Sink — Only Slightly Chipped, with Exciting Mystery Stain” and “IT Employee in Need of New Home.”
“We’ve been in need of some spring cleaning around here for a while,” a disgruntled physical resources employee said. “They put me in charge of making all these listings. Right now, I have all the items locked in a room downstairs until someone purchases them. I had to put tape over some of their mouths, but luckily not all of them can talk.”
The listings range in price from about $20 for items like “FANCY Pillow, Nice and Spongy” to about $10,000 for personnel.
“I was wandering around yesterday, and I heard some mumbling coming from this one room,” a freshman said. “Something about ‘eliminated my position,’ and just a bunch of groaning.”
In a press release, the university stated it hopes to gain around $500,000 for these sales.
According to the physical resources employee, only suggestive replies about “hook ups” and pictures of genitalia have been received in response to the listings, so far.

CCPA pioneers loud library
By Nick Figaro

Recently, CCPA made history in the world of libraries by providing the first loud workspace. By fostering distraction, the administration hopes to build an environment that isn’t lame.
“I like to take most of my phone calls in the library,” said Cynthia Pickles, a second-year graduate student that is getting kind of bored of this school. “That way people who are trying out this ‘reading’ thing can hear my side to all of my conversations.”
The locale has been a common retreat for students. The secluded location serves as a great lunch getaway.
“Oh, this isn’t a cafeteria?” asked Mike Keats, a sophomore trumpet student, while ripping out the pages of a musical score to use as a napkin.
The idea came to fruition a couple weeks ago in a board meeting. One of the goals was to help find ways to drown out the consistent chewing noises.
“It was really great to finally have something to talk about,” Professor Chris Cringle said. “Usually, we all just kind of sit there and don’t talk. Some people nap, but I was never really good at that. I think it’s because I sleep pretty well at home. I’m just not tired enough, y’know?”
The library’s innovation comes fresh on the heels of the “half-page” initiative. Ink costs have dropped dramatically now that the copy machines only print the top half of every copy.
It’s ideas like these that are making administration think of more creative revenue building ventures. Talk of tearing down the bookshelves to make room for arcade-style games may become a reality next fall.
“Most of these books haven’t been checked out in decades,” Librarian Paul Johnson said. “I’m honestly not even sure what most of these books are about. The only music I listen to comes out of my car’s dashboard.”
The library is also considering inverting the hours they keep the door open. If they open at 9 p.m. and close at 5 a.m., they’ll be able to really capitalize on the university’s prime location for nightlife.
“What we really have to do now is finalize a drinks list,” Dean Todd Packer said. “I mean, how trashed do we want these kids to get? Anything less than puking through the halls is less than satisfactory in my book.”
One student jokingly suggested that the music students could provide entertainment for outside guests. Of course, none of the students of CCPA are enough of a nerd to have any of this semester’s music learned already.

Roosevelt expands social justice mission by admitting first canine student
By Mike P. Sullivan

Roosevelt University’s first ever canine applicant was accepted into the Heller College of Business earlier this week. Administrators have been excited to announce this new expansion of the university’s social justice mission.
The canine admittee, Princess Rose, is an eight-pound female dachshund.
In a press release, the university stated that it sought to include different aspects of social justice in its practices in order to set itself apart from other institutions. It said that admitting canines to the school would not only increase admission rates, but also present to the animal population that the school is serious about all aspects of equality, including animals.
Rose said she was excited to reflect on her experience as the first canine admittee.
“I was distraught for a while after sending out so many applications to colleges around Chicago that I was beginning to feel like no one respected the animal population,” she said. “When Roosevelt contacted me after I put in my application, I was left with hope for other canines like me who are seeking a better education.”
Rose went on to discuss her home life prior to her acceptance to the university.
She expressed that years of going on walks, playing with squeaky toys and being dependent on her owner left her extremely bored.
“As a female canine, it is difficult to start in a field like police work like many other male canines do, and I was tired of the same old thing at home,” she said. “You can only squeak the same squeaky toy for so long. I wanted more for my life and for the others who feel that canines deserve an education just as much as humans.”
After Rose’s admittance, the university experienced a tripling of applicants of the canine species, according to the Admissions Office.
Rose said she is optimistic about the progress that can be made for equality towards animals.
“If the school is trying to open up equality amongst other species, such as my own, I am all for it,” she said. “I always felt that getting an education would make me a better canine, and if dogs are a man’s best friend, then why aren’t more humans acting like it by helping them become more independent?”

New Lakers football team recruiting soon, set to play on Dunkin’ Donuts roof
By Scooba Sam (Scooba Steve’s Father)

Roosevelt University will offer tryouts for a new Lakers football team soon. The team is looking to start its season next fall.
The downtown environment has caused the school to think progressively. The team practices will be held on top of the Dunkin’ Donuts on State and Van Buren, with games held wherever there is the most light at the time.
“I feel like we can put together a good team,” said Yum Cornflake, the new head coach. “Unfortunately, though, to replicate a full-size football field, we’ll have to run in circles on the roof about 20 times.”
Cornflake explained that there is an upside to the small space.
“Our players will be very good at making quick cuts when avoiding falling off the roof,” he said.
The school has already taken out insurance to cover for cars that get hit with footballs during practice.
Rumblings around campus suggested that the new football coaches will try to steal players from other Roosevelt sports.
Quarterbacks Coach Doug Funny explained, “That Jason English has got an arm. Baseball shmaseball, he’s definitely ours.”
Offensive Coordinator Way Pwoteen said he has eyes on another athlete at Roosevelt.
“That Tyree York knows what’s up,” he said. “He’s elusive and could easily play several positions!”
Uniforms are projected to be rainbow colored to emphasize the school’s social justice and equality values.
The first game is scheduled at the grass lot across from Chinatown Square against Columbia College, which is looking to start a football team of its own to compete with Roosevelt.
Sources say, however, that Columbia is looking to play only two-hand-touch.

Professor Donnette Noble - Ru Professor - Chicago Marathon

RU Professor to participate in Chicago Marathon for cancer charity and love of family

By Shawn Gakhal
shawnonthetorch@gmail.com

Professor Donnette Noble - Ru Professor - Chicago Marathon

Registration began for the Oct. 12 Bank of America Chicago Marathon on March 19.
With more than 17,000 runners already signed up and a cap limit of 45,000, runners from around the world will compete in the Chicago Marathon, and one of them is Roosevelt University’s own Professor Donnette Noble.
Noble competed in the Chicago Marathon for the first time in 2012 and followed that up with an encore the following year.
Noble said she is excited to participate in this year’s marathon.
She recounted how she got involved and why she loves running in the first place.
“I set a goal a gazillion years ago that I would run my first marathon by the time I turned 30, and life just got in the way, and that never happened,” Noble said. “But I have been running since I was a toddler. It was not until Oct. 2012 when I ran the Chicago Marathon that I entered my first ever sanctioned running event. So, it was like a ‘go big or go home’ kind of thing. … I do it because I just love running that much.”
Noble described this year’s marathon as having a bit of a different tone than those of recent past.
“This year, I’m actually doing a charity run with Team DetermiNation, which is part of the fundraising team for the American Cancer Society,” Noble said.
She also talked about her primary and specific, personal goals for this year’s marathon.
“Every year, I try to accomplish something, because I’m very goal driven in all aspects of my life,” Noble said. “My first year, I simply wanted to finish a marathon. My second year was to finish the marathon and have a better time that my first year, and I knocked a significant amount of time off my results.
“My goal this year is to raise $1,000 for the ACS. That is my primary goal. But my personal goal is to qualify for the Boston Marathon, so I have to knock almost nine minutes off my time in order to do that. And my second goal is to knock 20 minutes off my time to qualify for… a guaranteed entry for [next year’s] Chicago Marathon.”
Noble’s decision to run the marathon for charity comes from her own personal losses that she’s endured throughout her life.
“I opted to run with the ACS because I lost my grandpa to cancer,” she said. “I’ve lost dear friends to cancer. I’ve lost brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law to cancer. So, I’ve just lost so many people to the disease, and I know so many other people who are currently fighting the disease or who are survivors. … I started to think about the issue of cancer, and I cannot think of a single person whose life has not been touched in some way, shape or form by cancer.”
Committed to raising $1,000 for the ACS, Noble said that she first paid the regular marathon fee, plus an additional fee to be a part of the organization.
Among the many who have contributed to her fundraising efforts include one of her students, Lucas Coker, president of the Criminal Justice Society at Roosevelt.
On her website, Noble has a list of names who she will be running in memory of.
The next line reads this, “Yes, this year I will be running with a greater purpose.”
Participants can register either with a guaranteed entry or enter through a registration lottery, which closes April 7.
It costs $185 to register for the Chicago Marathon and $210 for those who are not residents of the United States.

SGA Executive Board

SGA’s weekly agenda: MAP grant trip, upcoming elections, collaboration with SPEED

By Shawn Gakhal

SGA Executive Board

The Student Government Association met last Wednesday to talk about a number of agenda items, which included the Monetary Award Program, upcoming senate elections and a town hall meeting with SPEED.
President Joseph Knotts began by addressing the senators about a report about university senate representation.
“As far as my report on the university senate, it was discussed that they’re restructuring the university senate and voted on it,” Knotts said. “[The College] of Arts and Sciences will have the same percentage of representation, but there will be a less total number of university senators representing their department. But there was some rearrangement in the percentages of the other departments. I think CCPA might have gained a couple of percentage points.”
Knots then moved on to brief the senators on the March 28 and 29 event “Relay for Life,” in which President Charles Middleton volunteered to get duck taped to a wall for charity.
Vice President Daly Tongren then brought up the MAP Grant Lobby Day trip to Springfield on April 1 and took a headcount on who would be in attendance.
The MAP grant is a program that provides need-based grant money to college students who qualify, which also does not need to be repaid.
On April 1, a bus will arrive at 7:45 a.m. to shuttle all who are interested in speaking with Illinois legislators on the behalf of students in interest of increasing MAP grant funding.
The attention briefly shifted away from the MAP grant event, as Student Trustee Chris Mich spoke about the Board of Trustees’ quarterly meeting.
“The trustees had their quarterly board meeting last week, and the attendance was very, very low to the point where they didn’t even have a quorum to vote on any agenda items,” Mich said. “It was, mostly, updates that were discussed.”
Recently, attendance has also been low for SGA meetings. On March 19, the SGA meeting was cancelled due to low turnout, and just one committee chair was present during the March 26 meeting.
Knotts urged the senators to run for executive positions in the upcoming elections, which are, tentatively, scheduled for April.
“I want to reiterate what a great opportunity it is for any of you who are considering it,” Knotts said. “It’s really going to open a lot of doors for you here at Roosevelt and beyond. It’s a great time. We learn from each other and from the whole environment.”
Jennifer Tani, assistant vice president of community engagement in the Government Relations and University Outreach office, then had the floor to talk about the MAP grant trip.
“So many Roosevelt students rely on these need-based aid grants,” Tani said. “Our state and federal budget are constantly scraping by with all these threats to eligibility and the amount of funding. It’s really important that each year we have students come down to Springfield and directly talk to our legislators. Whether you’re from Illinois or not, your voice is really important.”
Tani elaborated on the problem that exists for many college students that are affected by the lack of MAP grant funding.
“If you go anywhere on campus in the spring, you’ll see signs up that say ‘Apply for FAFSA,’ ‘Apply for student aid,’” Tani said. “And each year, the cut off for MAP grants is earlier and earlier because they cannot fund enough students. It’s a really big problem and a really important priority to support all of our students.”
After the MAP grant trip was mapped out, Knotts concluded with an announcement about a town hall meeting with SPEED on April 15.
“They want to collaborate with the SGA, which is great because we’ve been wanting to do something like that for some time now,” Knotts said. “And we’ll talk about details at future meetings.”

Angie Briese - MA Secondary Education Student

Annual Schaumburg Casino Night offers games, excitement and more

By Steve Deku
rutorchnews@gmail.com
Angie Briese - MA Secondary Education Student

Students and alumni alike came to enjoy a night of gambling and socializing at the Schaumburg Campus, as it hosted its annual Casino Night in the Alumni Hall on March 28.
Attendees were given replica cash to spend and gamble in a variety of ways. Games included blackjack, roulette, slot machines and a prize wheel. All proceeds from the night benefitted Autism Speaks.
The theme for the night was “The Great Gatsby,” which featured a variety of decorations, mock-tails and a screening of “The Great Gatsby” film throughout the night.
Participants tried to raise their total dollar amount in order to win prizes like a 32-inch television, Cubs tickets, skydiving tickets, a Keurig machine, movie tickets and a Bluetooth boombox. Other prizes, such as movie tickets, haircuts and Chicago Bulls posters, were given on the prize wheel.
“It is so much fun,” freshman Amanda Gelinas said. “I’m having a great time.”
Pharmacy student Sukhi Kang agreed with Gelinas’ sentiments.
“I really enjoyed it,” Kang said. “I think it’s really neat how they pulled out all these games.”
Pharmacy student Harmeet Chahil said he was looking to win the television.
“I’m going for the TV — I will win it,” he said.
_24A3284
Jalapeño poppers, mozzarella bites, pigs-in-a-blanket, fruit and vegetables were served, but nothing compared to the popularity of the chocolate fountain, which hosted a plethora of bite-sized treats for dipping, such as cakes, pretzels and marshmallows.
As the night came to an end, the prizes were raffled off to an excited crowd.
Chahil won the television, as he said he would, while Gelinas won the skydiving tickets.
“Events like these are so much fun,” Gelinas said. “If students know about them, there’s no reason they shouldn’t come.”
Chahil agreed, but with a different motive.
“People should come,” he said. “But thanks — more for me to win.”

bracketology

Pop Culture Radar: What’s Trending This Week

By Samantha Reid
samonthetorch@gmail.com

Books
the giver
‘The Giver’
Chances are, most people probably already read “The Giver” way back in the fifth grade. But classics are always worth a second read, especially this one. Lowry’s famous novel has been turned into a movie, with the first trailer debuting last week. Before we had “The Hunger Games,” “Divergent,” and countless other dystopian worlds, there was this 1993 novel. It might be billed as a children’s novel, but it’s a must-read before the movie hits theaters this August.

‘Redeployment’ by Phil Klay
Redeployment
Fans of war novels like Tim O’Brien’s “The Things They Carried” should pick up Phil Klay’s new book “Redeployment,” which takes a look at what it’s like on the frontlines in Afghanistan and Iraq. The author is a veteran himself, so the story takes on an unparalleled sense of authenticity. The book weaves together the jarring stories of multiple characters in their lives overseas and through the shock of readjusting to home life. Klay manages to artfully express the ways in which war never really ends for those who experience it firsthand.

TV
the mindy project 1
‘The Mindy Project’ returns
Fox has a line-up of stellar comedies this season, none more so than “The Mindy Project.” Mindy Kaling came to fame both acting and writing for “The Office,” and her new show proves she isn’t just a background character but is a scene-stealing star in her own right. Season two of the series has been on hiatus since late January, but fans can finally get answers to their burning questions when the ensemble comedy returns April 1.

‘Game of Thrones’ premieres
game of thrones
Over the years, HBO has had no shortage of talked-about television. “Game of Thrones,” however, may be one of its biggest series yet. Fans can catch up on the past three seasons in anticipation of the season four premiere on April 6. Reviewers are already touting this season as the show’s “most eventful yet,” and trailers for the highly anticipated episodes can be found on the HBO website. The producers of the hit show are hoping to run for eight seasons, so there’s still plenty of time for newcomers to catch up to the fandom.

Movies
captain america
‘Captain America’ sequel
Marvel fans will undoubtedly be out in droves on April 4 –– or more accurately, for late night showings on April 3 –– to see “Captain America: The Winter Soldier.” The sequel to the 2011 film promises more action, more Chris Evans and more superheroes. This installment features not only Captain America, but the Black Widow, as well, played by Scarlett Johansson. While this chapter in the Steve Rogers story takes place in modern day, the Soviet villain calls back to an older time reminiscent of the first film.

Anchorman-2.jpg

‘Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues’ on DVD
Will Ferrell fans can now watch “the legend continue” from home. “Anchorman 2” is out on DVD and Blu-ray April 1. April Fool’s Day is fitting for the release of this film. Where it lacks in substantial plot it makes up for in rapid-fire jokes and one unexpected celebrity cameo after another. But let’s get real –– audiences don’t look to Ron Burgundy and the Channel 4 News Team for a compelling plot. The movie delivers what it promises, which is laughs, even when the audience is laughing at how ridiculous it all is.

Media
meal sharing
Share a meal with a stranger?
The website mealsharing.com operates on an unconventional premise. Meal Sharing hooks tourists up with locals, inviting users to “eat with people from around the world.” Anyone living in Chicago can offer to host a foreign group for a home-cooked meal in their home, or travelers can
search for hosts at almost any destination. Hosts post menus along with photos, and visitors can opt to join. Some hosts ask for a “chip in” charge, but the real benefit is interesting conversation with people of different perspectives.
vogue cover

#WorldsMostTalkedAboutCouple
Kim Kardashian and Kanye West grace the cover of “Vogue” this month, and it’s already caused quite the controversy. The world’s highest performing fashion magazine, “Vogue,” is usually known for its artful covers and has featured some of the most prominent faces in fashion and entertainment. Readers and celebrities alike began blasting the cover and its grandiose hashtag just hours after its release, and even the nicest of critics called it “tacky” to feature the reality star. Seth Rogen and James Franco, who parodied Kanye’s “Bound 2” video, already released their own spoof of the cover.

Music
pharrell anna kendrick
Pharrell on SNL with Anna Kendrick
Pharrell’s “Happy” fever seems to have spread, gaining him the coveted spot as “Saturday Night Live” musical guest on April 5, following the release of his latest album in March. The episode will be hosted by funny girl and “Pitch Perfect” star Anna Kendrick. If Kendrick’s Twitter is any indication of her ability to deliver hilarious one-liners, viewers will definitely want to tune in. And one thing’s for sure: we can all resume “Pharrell Oversized Hat Watch 2014” in three, two, one…

summer concerts

Summer concert ticket sales
With only about a month left in the semester, students can start looking ahead to summer. And what’s a more quintessential part of summer than concerts? News of huge tours have already begun to trickle in, including everyone from The Goo Goo Dolls to One Direction to Panic at the Disco hitting up Chicago venues during the warmer months. Festival fans are already scrambling for tickets to Lollapalooza, which is taking over Grant Park from Aug. 1 to 3 with headliners Outkast, Skrillex, Kings of Leon and Eminem.

ETC
brunch
The best city to brunch
What’s the best way to spend a Sunday morning? With friends, shaking off a hangover and rehashing the previous night’s events. That’s where brunch comes in. Yelp declared Chicago the best city for brunches in 2013, and there’s no shortage of restaurants offering it these days. Whether brunch-goers are looking for a cute cafe or the best bottomless mimosas, the city’s got all its bases covered. Thrillist does all the work, breaking down the best Chicago brunches by neighborhood. One of the best deals? Angelina Ristorante in Lakeview, where $21 gets patrons an entree plus all the champagne and orange juice they can drink.
bracketology

Bracketology
On the off chance anyone’s NCAA bracket isn’t completely shot, fans are probably too busy checking basketball scores to be reading this article. But for those whose brackets have already been busted, all college basketball fans can do is look to next year. Many argue that bracketology just comes down to luck. After all, the odds of picking perfectly are about one in nine quintillion –– and no, that’s not a made up number. But for those who believe it’s more of a science, a mere $99 can pay for an online course through St. Joseph’s University that will teach the ins and outs of the ideal bracket. March Madness 2015 had better watch out.

IMG_1443

Sing Your Own Song: a spotlight for CCPA’s theatrical talent

By Daniel Johanson
rutorchnews@gmail.com

IMG_1443

The Chicago College of Performing Arts’ Theatre Conservatory put together a performance of songs that exemplify the current theatrical climate. The performance, entitled “Sing Your Own Song,” consisted of material that made its Chicago debut on March 28.
The musical content came from the minds of Marcy Heisler and Zina Goldrich, a songwriting duo whose fame is on the rise. Some of the songs came from their musical “Ever After,” which should see its time on Broadway in 2015.
“We will be honoring a team of songwriters who have been working together for 20 years by doing an entire showcase of their work,” Associate Professor of Theatre Ray Frewen said.
The “Sing Your Own Song” performance serves as a way to honor these composers while also giving the students a chance to shine.
“The performance is not a full length show with a script,” theater student Pablo Barajas said. “It is more of a showcase, full of individual solos, duets, trios, quartets and full company group numbers. There are 11 of us in the show, in all. It’s a mix of sophomore, junior and senior musical theatre majors.”
This style of consecutive numbers without a plot connection is similar to a revue, a format of French origin. This allows for a wide variety of content and opportunities for the students to grow as performers.
One of the songs performed, entitled “Alto’s Lament,” has a couple levels of humor involved. The referential nature of the song provides some inside jokes for those familiar with the repertoire, but has its own set of difficulties.
“‘Alto’s Lament’ [is] a song that references many alto lines in great American works of musical theatre,” Heisler said. “Respecting copyright is an issue very near and dear to our hearts, so we properly cleared all the passages referenced and share the royalties with rights holders and their estates.”
Of course, there are many different levels to copyright laws. “Alto’s Lament” is special in that it provides a perspective to help audiences and performance organizers better understand the importance of these laws.
The art in performances of this nature is the creation of another party. The beauty in this is the collaborative experience that can be felt by all involved.
“I think when you see your material in the hands and hearts of a Broadway performer, there’s nothing like it,” Heisler said. “There are things that actors can do with our material that we could only hope to do.”
Anyone that missed the performances this past weekend can still see some of the material at this year’s VIVID performance on April 8 in the Auditorium Theatre. The production has been condensed and will be used as a representative of what the department has to offer for incoming students and to the local Chicago area.

Millenial Pew Study 1

(A more accurate) portrait of the millennial

By Samantha Reid
samonthetorch@gmail.com

Millenial Pew Study 1

The term “millennial” seems to be everywhere these days. It’s become almost as pervasive as calling the younger generation “20-somethings,” with thousands of articles littering the Internet trying to analyze the generation of Twitter, selfies and student loan debt.
But “millennial” seems to carry a pejorative connotation these days. Older politicians, writers and analysts seem stuck on stereotyping our generation as lazy, entitled and spoiled — all terms far too broad for an entire age group of people, all of whom have grown up in different backgrounds and varying levels of hardship.
So what’s the truth? Pew Research Center took on the daunting task of defining the millennial by surveying a random sample of 18-to-33 year old Americans. What it found was sometimes predictable, sometimes surprising and almost entirely unique: a portrait of growing up in a rapidly changing world.
Among the unsurprising findings, millennials were the age group most comfortable with technology. Pew deemed the group “digital natives,” or “the only generation for which [new] technologies are not something they’ve had to adapt to.”
For our parents, things like smartphones and social media are a trend they’ve had to learn. For us, it’s something we’ve grown up with, as natural as reading a book or watching television. This makes us more adaptable to new technology as it arrives on the scene.
Pew also found millennials to be the most racially diverse generation and the most politically liberal. While half the demographic self-identifies as politically independent, the way they vote doesn’t necessarily match up. In the past two presidential elections, the Millennial Generation has overwhelmingly voted democratic.
This may be due to the importance millennials, as a group, tend to place on social issues. Survey subjects tended to side with liberal politics on hot-button issues like marijuana legalization and same-sex marriage.
One way millennials stood out most from older generations was in the realm of religion. According to Pew, “Not only are [millennials] less likely than older generations to be affiliated with any religion, they are also less likely to say they believe in God.”
Eleven percent of the 18-to-33 age range say they don’t believe in God, practically double the number compared to past generations.
Several Roosevelt University students agreed with the Pew findings, believing it accurately represented the place of religion amongst their peers.
“I feel that most of the people I’ve met [at Roosevelt] have no particular religious faith,” sophomore Angie Hernandez said. “I identify with a religion only due to family ties [to the religion].”
Another way millennials stand out starkly from their predecessors is in their reluctance to tie the knot. Where generation X and baby boomers placed a high premium on marriage, millennials seem to be delaying the practice considerably.
According to the study, “The median age at first marriage is now the highest in modern history — 29 for men and 27 for women.”
So, while our parents were rushing to get married straight out of high school or college, graduates are now taking their time. With high unemployment and skyrocketing student loan debt, finances are a common reason millennials hold off on spending what money they have on a wedding.
“Life gets in the way — education, jobs, money, travel and realism,” senior Jocelyn Dunlop said. Hernandez agreed with Dunlop’s sentiment.
“I feel as though our generation wants to get more out of life and complete our goals before we settle down,” Hernandez said.
The study also attempted to gage millennial opinion on matters like government and social environment. In a somewhat alarming show of social mistrust, only 19 percent of respondents agreed with the phrase “Most people can be trusted.”
“People are so consumed about worrying how people perceive them,” senior Michelle Papandrea said. “I think that accounts for some untruthful behaviors.”
But we’re not entirely cynical. When it comes to the future of the nation, millennials are more upbeat than any other generation.
Forty-nine percent of those surveyed said they felt that America’s best years are still ahead. In spite of growing up in a recession and wartime, young Americans maintained optimism that situations and government will improve.
The Pew study painted a decidedly different picture than the stereotypically entitled millennial. Instead, the data showed millennials as an almost direct juxtaposition to our predecessors: a racially diverse, technologically advanced generation with unprecedented liberal leanings. Growing up with more opportunity than ever before but also greater economic hardship than ever before has led us into a great unknown where our 20s are no longer necessarily built for settling down with a family, but rather, landing a competitive job and beginning to chip away at the debt we amassed to get there.

jr aquino (courtesy of his official facebook page)

YouTube Showcase to bring online talent to RU

By Madelyn Olsen
rutorchnews@gmail.com

SPEED will host a YouTube Showcase in the Murray-Green Library on April 3 at 7 p.m. Roosevelt students Sandy Mousheh, Emma Elisa, Oommen George and Gabe Evans will open for YouTube performers JR Aquino, Andrew Garcia and Landon Austin.
In anticipation for the big event, the Torch gathered some information on the featured YouTube performers.

jr aquino (courtesy of his official facebook page)
JR Aquino:
YouTube user “JRAquinoMusic” is a singer/songwriter from Anchorage, Alaska, currently residing in Las Vegas, Nev. Aquino has 560,099 subscribers on his channel. With more than 100 videos dating back five years, Aquino has uploaded a wide array of covers, as well as original songs.
His most popular video is an original song titled “By Chance (You & I)” with more than six million views. In addition to being a YouTube star, Aquino also appeared on the third season of the hit TV show “The Voice,” when he won a spot on Cee Lo Green’s team with a rendition of Bruno Mars’ “Just the Way You Are.”
Unfortunately, his time on the show was short, as he was eliminated in the battle rounds in episode 10. Aquino also made it to the Top 40 of “American Idol” during its fourth season.
Now, five years since his first YouTube video, Aquino has a full length album, “This Time Around,” released in April of 2013, under his belt. He has also played shows in New York, Boston and Las Vegas, among other cities, and has a Texas tour scheduled for this summer.

andrew garcia (credit americanidol.com)
Andrew Garcia:
YouTube user “andrewagarcia” is a California-native singer with 461,330 YouTube subscribers, and a little more than 50 videos. His first video is a cover of Owl City’s “Fireflies,” uploaded in January of 2010.
Garcia’s videos mainly feature covers of popular songs, his most popular videos reaching up to two million views. Outside of YouTube, Garcia was the ninth place finalist on the ninth season of “American Idol” where he was praised by the judges — even Simon Cowell — as being a “genuinely good singer.”
Since then, Garcia was featured in the “American Idols LIVE! Tour” in 2010, where he sang “Straight Up” by Paula Abdul and “Sunday Morning” by Maroon 5.
Garcia released his first single “Crazy” in June 2011. Also in 2011, Garcia began performing with Yesterday, Today, Forever, a musical and comedy performing group.
In 2012, Garcia began appearing in popular YouTube user Nigahiga’s videos, and acted as a guest judge in the third episode of the YOMYOMF Network web series, Internet Icon.

landon austin (courtesy of his official facebook page)
Landon Austin:
YouTube user “LandonAustin” is a singer-songwriter from Nashville. He has 68 videos, 171,508 subscribers and more than 14 million total video views. His most popular video is a cover of Jason Mraz’s “I Won’t Give Up,” with more than one million views, while his original song “Once In A Lifetime” has received more than 990,000 views.
Austin started uploading videos of himself singing about two years ago, debuting with a cover of “Fear You Won’t Fall” by Joshua Radin. On iTunes, Austin has released multiple cover albums and singles, some which feature original material.
Austin’s cover of Taylor Swift’s “Sparks Fly” was tweeted about by Swift herself, who stated that she “Really liked it!,” which led to Austin later meeting her in person. Outside of his strong online presence, Austin has played shows across the country, including stops in Florida, New York, Texas and everywhere in between.

summer-22jump

What summer movie are you most excited for?

School is out, summer blockbusters are in. The Torch staff wants to know: what summer movie are you most excited about?

 

american ham

Chicago Critics Film Festival returns to Lakeview

by Samantha Reid
samonthetorch@gmail.com

Chicago’s summer festival season gets a fair share of hype, most of which is directed at Lollapalooza and the music scene. However, movie buffs have a lot to look forward to as well– most notably, the Chicago Critics Film Festival that will be making its return to the Music Box Theatre.

From May 9-15, film aficionados can head to the historic theatre for twenty-three highly anticipated film premieres hand-picked by Chicago’s top critics. A full festival pass will run movie-goers $150, but those looking to attend individual premieres can do so for as low as $12. Here’s a sneak peek of highlights from each night:

Continue reading

Tips for Moving Out - Caitlan - by steve

Moving out of the dorms? Follow these tips to ease frustration

By Joelle Tatter rutorchnews@gmail.com Tips for Moving Out - Caitlan - by steve

It’s that time of year again when posters for things to do at very end of the year are plastered on walls, when the library is open for longer hours than normal and when every floor from 14 on up in the Wabash Building has a sign reminding residents of the move-out date.

For all students living in Wabash Building and the University Center, in addition to being time for final tests and projects, it’s also time to start packing up and getting ready to move out of the place that’s been home for the past nine months. Continue reading

Crime Blotter: Chicago Colleges

CRIME BLOTTER: CHICAGO COLLEGES
By Latricia Wilson
rutorchnews@gmail.com

The Roosevelt University Torch Crime Blotter includes coverage of incidents having occurred within the perimeters of Chicago’s North and South Loop college campuses. Incidents having occurred on or near University of Chicago Streeterville and DePaul University Lincoln Park may also be included in the Crime Blotter. Periodically, the passing of college students or faculty will also be included in this blotter.

Continue reading

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 55 other followers